Services for Children

Services for Children

Page Contents

  • Speech Sound Disorders

  • Developmental Language Delay

  • Late Language Emergence ('Late Talkers')

  • Reading and Writing Disorders

  • Stuttering

  • Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Assessment

  • Treatment

  • Screening

  • Talking Tots Program

  • Resources

Clinical Areas

Speech Sound Disorders

 

Children can have trouble saying sounds clearly and it may be hard to understand what they are saying. They learn some sounds earlier and other sounds take longer to learn. A child who does not say sounds by the expected age may have a speech sound delay or disorder. Learn more.

Developmental Language Delay

Developmental language delay can affect how a child talks or understand language. It can also affect their social interactions and be a barrier to learning. Signs of a developmental language delay could be that the child is not talking very much, is often misunderstood, talks like a younger child, struggles to find the right words, or that they don’t understand others. Learn more.

Late Language Emergence ('Late Talkers')

Many children who are late talkers seemingly "catch up" to peers by their early school years. These children score within the average range on standardized tests designed to help identify children with language delays and disorders. However, most score within the range considered 'low performance' compared to their peers. Later on, these children may have difficulty with reading and more complex language including grammar. Other children who are late talkers may eventually be diagnosed with developmental language delay after the age of four. Learn more.

Reading and Writing Disorders

Children can have trouble learning to read and write, which can make it hard to learn and do well in school. Difficulties with reading and writing can have different causes, for example problems with connecting letters to sounds (decoding) or reading comprehension. Learn more.

Stuttering

Many preschoolers go through periods with stuttering and/or speech disfluencies. Stuttering could be repetitions of whole words or part of words ("D-D-D-Danny"). It could also involve prolonged sounds ("mmmmm-mom") or blocks ("gimme.........that"). Some children do not grow out of the stuttering by themselves and might need treatment, especially if they are showing signs of frustration or tension, if there is a family history of stuttering, and if they are male. Learn more.

Autism Spectrum Disorders

Children with autism with difficulties with social communication, expressive language, and comprehension can benefit from working with a speech-language pathologist. To learn more about the individualized programming offered at Shoreline, contact us to book an exploratory meeting (no charge). Learn more.

Assessment

Is my toddler a late talker? Does my child have a language delay or disorder? Does my child have reading or writing difficulties?

The purpose of assessment is to diagnose speech or language disorders. By evaluating communication strengths and impairment, we can identify activity limitations and participation restrictions for both home and school environments. The assessment informs treatment planning and recommendations, with the focus of helping the child reach their potential.

A brief hearing screening is typically a part of assessment.

 

For children learning more than one language, we also offer specialized bilingual assessments. Learn more.

Treatment

 

I want to get professional support to help my child with their development of speech, language, and communication skills.

Treatment is available for children in the areas of speech, language, reading, writing, and stuttering. All treatment plans are individualized to the needs and preferences of each client and incorporate evidence-informed procedures and programs. Treatment plans incorporate both impairment-based goals (e.g., saying "s") and functional/real-life goals (e.g., saying "s" clearly when saying their name "Simon" in play).

Screening

Should my child have an assessment?

Screening is sometimes used to help identify people who may require an assessment. It does not determine the presence or absence of a communication disorder, nor does it provide a profile of communication impairment and strengths. They are often done with children getting ready to go to school, or who are at risk due to a family history.

Screening is available for preschool and school-age speech and language development.

Read more: Preschool Speech & Language Screening

Includes:

  30-minute screening session (speech sounds, language, hearing, fluency)

  Cost of materials

  Screening Report (up to 2 printed copies)

December Community Service Event

For the month of December 2019 our clinicians are providing screenings for preschool and school-aged children in Dartmouth, Eastern Passage, Cole Harbour, and surrounding areas. For this community event, the usual professional fee will be waived. Screenings are available in English or French.

For more information or to book an appointment, contact us.

Download poster.

If a full assessment is recommended following the screening, participants are under no obligation to seek such services through Shoreline. Documentation will be provided of the results of the screening.

Talking Tots Program

 

In this group, parents learn evidence-based language facilitation strategies to boost their child’s comprehension and expression of language. With 8 parent-child pairs per session, this is also a great opportunity to meet other parents. This program is open for parents with children age 6-24 months, at all levels of language development (children who are typically developing or who have a known or suspected language delay). Learn more.

Resources

"Ear Infections"

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

https://www.asha.org/public/hearing/Otitis-Media/

Speech Language Development Chart

http://www.srsdeaf.org/Downloads/SpeechLanguage_Development_Chart.pdf

When to Consult with a Speech-Language Pathologist

This checklist provides a list of 'red flags' to watch for as your child develops. If you check 'yes' to one or more item, you may wish to consult with a speech-language pathologist. The information gained during an assessment helps you to make informed decisions about supporting your child's development.

Development of Speech Sounds: A Guide for Parents

This chart provides a general guide for parents about when speech sounds are acquired by children.

Early Development of Expressive Language: A Guide for Parents

This chart provides a general guide of the milestones for expressive vocabulary, sentence length, and grammar development. It also provides several red flags to help guide parents to known when to consult with a speech-language pathologist.

Shoreline Speech Therapy

Paddlers Cove Professional Centre

300 Prince Albert Rd., Suite 215, Dartmouth, NS, B2Y 4J2

info@shoreline-speech.com

phone (902) 405-7858 or (902) 219-3065 

fax (902) 704-5444

© Shoreline Speech Therapy, 2018-2019. Proudly created with wix.com

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